PRC-112D  Personal Locator Beacon


The AN/PRC-112 survival radio provides Army Search and Rescue (SAR) personnel with the capability to perform combat search and rescue (CSAR) missions of downed aircrew personnel. The Survival Radio is critical to minimizing the exposure of not only downed aircrew personnel but also the personnel and equipment of forces conducting the CSAR.

The AN/PRC-112 radio is a multi-mission transceiver used in conjunction with the AN/ARS-6 Personnel Locator Radio Set, and the KY-913 Program Loader to make up the Army Personnel Location System (PLS). The AN/PRC-112 acts as a transponder, supplying ranging and personnel identification to the AN/ARS-6 system. Additionally, it performs beacon and air-to-ground voice functions. A user's location can be accurately determined when used in combination with an interrogator equipped aircraft for rescue/extraction.

The AN/PRC-112 survival radio provides Army Search and Rescue (SAR) personnel with the capability to perform combat search and rescue (CSAR) missions of downed aircrew personnel. The Survival Radio is critical to minimizing the exposure of not only downed aircrew personnel but also the personnel and equipment of US forces conducting the CSAR.

The AN/PRC-112 radio is a multi-mission transceiver used in conjunction with the AN/ARS-6 Personnel Locator Radio Set, and the KY-913 Program Loader to make up the Army Personnel Location System (PLS). The AN/PRC-112 acts as a transponder, supplying ranging and personnel identification to the AN/ARS-6 system. Additionally, it performs beacon and air-to-ground voice functions. A user's location can be accurately determined when used in combination with an interrogator equipped aircraft for rescue/extraction.

The AN/PRC-112 currently contains 11 internal modules, of which three critical modules can no longer be manufactured. Due to the obsolescence of these critical modules CECOM has obtained funding to enable a redesign effort to upgrade the radio to state of the art technology. As part of this effort, the radio will incorporate acceptance capability for any power source (including rechargeable/commercial batteries), reduce power consumption, and incorporate indicators for low power and operational status. There are also options built into the contract, to include a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) tagger capability, a Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) capability and over the horizon capability.

On December 23, 2000, a contract was awarded to Engineering and Professional Services (EPS) for the purpose of upgrading the AN/PRC-112 Survival Radio, designing out the obsolete modules and replacing them with state-of-the-art circuitry. EPS has formed a consortium with Tadrian/Spectralink, Kaiser Electronics and Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD) to provide the AN/PRC-112 upgrade for the U.S. Government. The consortium breaks down this way: EPS as the prime contractor, is responsible for the Program Management and Integrated Logistics Support of this contract; Tadiran/Spectralink is responsible for the technical oversight of the upgrade program and will be repackaging the current Survival Radio circuitry of its PRC-434 into the AN/PRC-112 radio. Kaiser Electronics will be the producer of the new circuit card upgrade kits and any future end item AN/PRC-112D production; and Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD) will be responsible for the incorporation of these kits into existing inventory AN/PRC-112 radios. TYAD will remove the old electronics from the radio and incorporate the new circuit cards.

The AN/PRC-112D Survival Radio provides the most cost effective way of dealing with growing obsolescence, while adopting the most reliable and advanced solution available and reducing total cost of ownership. This state-of-the-art upgrade with programmable software results in reduced logistics costs, increased product reliability, and increases mission readiness.

Operation modes:
Frequency Range: 121.5 MHz

225 MHz to 299.975 MHz
Available channels: 3000 in 25 kHz steps
Frequency stability: + 5ppm
Modulation modes: AM voice

AM swept-tone beacon:121.5 MHz and 243 MHz

DME transpond: any UHF channel
Voice Channel

Swept-tone beacon: 121.5 MHz and 243 MHz

DME transpond: any UHF channel
Dimensions: 7.69 in. high x 3 in. wide x 1.5 in. deep
Weight: 28 ounces with battery
Volume: 28 cubic inches
Ancillary Equipment: Rechargeable batteries (upgraded version)

Non-rechargeable batteries

External Power Adapter
Maintenance Concept: Repair at AVUM is limited to replacement of nonrepairable items such as batteries, knobs, earphone, antenna, pins and textile bag.

All other repairs are done by the Depot including replacement of nonrepairable modules and assemblies.
                                    PRC-112 Program Loader


The AN/PRC-112 survival radio provides Army Search and Rescue (SAR) personnel with the capability to perform combat search and rescue (CSAR) missions of downed aircrew personnel. The Survival Radio is critical to minimizing the exposure of not only downed aircrew personnel but also the personnel and equipment of forces conducting the CSAR.

The AN/PRC-112 radio is a multi-mission transceiver used in conjunction with the AN/ARS-6 Personnel Locator Radio Set, and the KY-913 Program Loader to make up the Army Personnel Location System (PLS). The AN/PRC-112 acts as a transponder, supplying ranging and personnel identification to the AN/ARS-6 system. Additionally, it performs beacon and air-to-ground voice functions. A user's location can be accurately determined when used in combination with an interrogator equipped aircraft for rescue/extraction .

  PRC-112 Program Loader
PRC-90-2  SAR BEACON
                                                      PRC-90-2  PLB

This is a survival radio that is carried in the emergency vest of air crew members. It can transmit a beacon (attention getting warble tone) on 243.0 MHz.  Voice on 243.0 or 282.8 MHz and Morse Code in Modulated Continuos Wave (MCW) mode on 243.0.  It will receive voice on 243.0 and 282.8 MHz.  The previous frequencies are for Military emergency communications.  The PRC-90 does not work on the civilian emergency frequency of 121.5 MHz nor does it work on the international distress frequency of 406.025 MHz.

Note: Aircraft radios use AM so that when two transmissions double both transmissions are heard.  This is unlike FM where if one station is stronger than the other (by about 3 dB) the capture effect eliminates the weaker signal and it is not heard.  Since an AM receive will not have an audible output when a pure CW signal is being received, a Modulated CW signal is used and the AM receiver outputs the modulation frequency.


The AN/PRC-90 radio set is a dual channel transmitter/receiver capable of transmitting
 up to 60 nm (line of sight, depending on receiving aircraft's altitude).  It operates on guard (243.0) or SAR primary operating frequency (282.8) with a mode for swept tone signal on 243.0 only.  Transmission of beacon or code can be up to 70 nm.  Average battery life is about 14 hours.Radio is equipped with external earphone jacks to assist pilot in hearing radio transmission with helmet on."

We have few units available for sale with new MIL batteries .
SARBE 7  PLB
SARBE 7 PLB

When activated by the release cord, the SARBE 7 PLB transmits on
121.5 and 243 MHz a beacon signal (no voice capability )

Transmissions on these frequencies will be detected by military aircraft
operating within line of sight of the PLB (assuming the aircraft have
TR+G selected).

In particular, SAR helicopters are able tohome on SARBE 7
transmissions. Furthermore, under European and ICAO guidelines,
civilian commercial aircraft are obliged to monitor 121.5 MHz.
In addition to airborne monitoring, the Distress and Diversion (D&D)
Cells at Prestwick and Swanwick employ a total of 21 terrestrial
receiver sites throughout Scotland, England and Wales to
auto-triangulate on transmissions receivedon both 121.5 and
243 MHz.

Although these receivers are mainly for aircraft in flight,
transmissions from PLBs at ground level in the receiver sites’ vicinity
maybe detected directly. Many airfields also monitor these
aeronautical distress frequencies.
( we have only few units available for sale )